The Closing of the Republican Mind

The election of President Trump has coincided with a reaction among Republican voters against open-mindedness, open borders and an open society in general — not to mention a growing hostility to cognitive elites. … Countless analyses have demonstrated that Trump won the election by combining support from traditional Republican voters […] Read more »

Views on Power and Influence in Washington

Most Americans say they have too little power in Washington these days, according to a new survey by The AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Three in 4 Americans say they have too little influence in Washington and 76 percent say poor people have too little influence. Majorities say that […] Read more »

The End of the Left and the Right as We Knew Them

By now it has become quite clear that conservative parties in Europe and the United States have been gaining strength from white voters who have been mobilized around issues related to nationalism — resistance to open borders and to third-world immigration. In the United States, this development has been exacerbated […] Read more »

The Democratic Party Is in Worse Shape Than You Thought

Sifting through the wreckage of the 2016 election, Democratic pollsters, strategists and sympathetic academics have reached some unnerving conclusions. What the autopsy reveals is that Democratic losses among working class voters were not limited to whites; that crucial constituencies within the party see its leaders as alien; and that unity […] Read more »

It’s time to bust the myth: Most Trump voters were not working class.

Media coverage of the 2016 election often emphasized Donald Trump’s appeal to the working class. The Atlantic said that “the billionaire developer is building a blue-collar foundation.” The Associated Press wondered what “Trump’s success in attracting white, working-class voters” would mean for his general election strategy. On Nov. 9, the […] Read more »

A Tale of Two Populisms

… Trump’s populism surely played a role in the surge of white working-class voters to the GOP ticket in 2016. But Trump’s brand of populism—and more importantly, that of working-class whites—differs in important ways from the populism of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. I don’t mean only that Trump’s populism […] Read more »