Party Hoppers: Understanding Voters Who Switched Partisan Affiliation

Partisan affiliation is one of the most stable features of the modern American electorate. While individuals’ feelings toward politicians or their attitudes about policy can change quickly, partisanship is a deep-seated identity resistant to change. Within the last five years, however, we have observed a significant amount of partisan switching […] Read more »

What if Trump ditched the GOP?

… What if, having systematically attacked what seems like every other institution involved in American government — the judiciary, the intelligence community, the press, the election process, law enforcement, Congress — he’s now set to attack and undermine the institution whose nomination he commandeered to obtain the presidency? What if […] Read more »

In America, Every Day Is Independents’ Day

Americans love the concept of independence, whether it’s about annually celebrating freedom from the British or fetishizing individualism. In honor of America’s Independence Day, we figured it was as good a time as any to explore America’s political independents. What makes this a tricky task, though, is that independents aren’t […] Read more »

Partisan Identification Is ‘Sticky,’ but About 10% Switched Parties Over the Past Year

Those who study politics have long known that a person’s party affiliation is a strong predictor of how they will vote and what their opinions will be on most political issues. Some of the power of partisanship comes from its relative immutability: Most people remain loyal to a political party. […] Read more »

Taking Trump’s Temperature Amongst His Supporters (and Opponents), Part 2

Last week, we released the results of a national poll of voters who said they supported President Donald Trump in the 2016 election, as well as focus groups of mostly Trump voters (but also some voters who either supported Hillary Clinton or voted third party last year). We found that […] Read more »